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12 Days of Christmas: Day 2 Tabletop Christmas trees Set of 3 Giveaway

UPDATE: This giveaway is closedCongrats to Angie Shaw who was randomly selected to receive the set of 3 Tabletop Christmas Trees.

Today is day 2 of our 12 days of Christmas and giveaways. Today’s Giveaway includes a set of three Table Top Christmas tree. As beautiful as these decorations are what get’s me most excited is how INEXPENSIVE they were to make. I literally only spent $1.50 on all three. $1 for tissue paper and $0.50 for the posterboard everything else you’ll most likely have on hand.

Before getting started enter today’s giveaway for a chance to take these bad boys home with you!


Step 1: First grab your supplies and settle in because this project will take some time:

  • Posterboard
  • tissue paper- cut into 1″ strips (I picked mine up from the dollar tree)
  • plastic cup
  • mod podge
  • foam paint brush
  • twine/string
  • tape
  • exacto knife / scissors
  • bamboo skewers
  • pencil
  • Garden snips (not pictured)
  • Glue gun and glue sticks (not pictured)

Paper Christmas tree supplies Step 2: Determine the heights you want your trees to be. I made 3 different trees varying in height from 11½” to 15½” to 18½”. Tie a section of string to your pencil and when you’ve determined your preferred tree heights, measure out the corresponding amount of twine. Holding down the sting at the corner of your poster board draw an arc from one edge of your posterboard to the other like an old school compass. This will ensure that your tree stands straight on your flat surface.
 Step 3: Using your exacto knife or scissors, cut out your arced shape. Scissors are a fine tool for the job, but I prefer to use my exacto knife rather than try to fight the floppy posterboard into submission.
Step 4: With your piece of posterboard cut out, begin rolling it into itself creating a cone shape. Rolling overly tight at first will help curl your posterboard and you’ll end up with fewer bends and creases in your posterboard.
Step 5: There’s a chance, depending on the size of tree you’ve chosen that the base of the tree will be wider than the widest part of plastic cup. So, during this step see if the widest part of the base of your cone is about the same width as the widest part of the plastic cup. Adjust the tightness of your cone accordingly.
Step 6: Now secure your cone to shape. Using several pieces of tape, tape the edge to prevent unraveling. Along the top and bottom I recommend laying the strips of tape horizontally, perpendicular to the seam on the poster board.
 Step 7: Now slide the cone over top of the upturned plastic cup. If there is a little extra cup hanging out at the bottom. Remove the poster board cone and cut away a portion of the plastic cup (the actual bottom of the top) so that it fit snugly inside of it.

With your cone fitting nice and tightly over your plastic cup it’s a good idea to attach them to  each other. You can either use glue or tape, which ever you prefer. I selected tape since it would make it even easier and I wouldn’t have the drying time of glue to consider.

Step 8: Now comes time to embellish the tree forms you’ve just created. I did this 3 different ways. First I took several 1″ strips of tissue paper and folded them in half so that the decorative side, in this case gold, would be on the outside. Step 9: Start by securing the paper to the posterboard at the very top with a small amount of glue. Begin rolling the paper around the tree twisting the paper up as it begins to slope too much. We’re trying to achieve straight horizontal lines.
Continue this process all down the length of the tree stopping to glue or even tape periodically. Add additional strips of tissue paper as you work your way down the form leaving enough to over lap the bottom and successfully hide the edge of the plastic cup.
 Taping or gluing the excess over and around the edge of your tree’s base will ensure that it does not come unraveled or tear as you move your trees around or place them in storage. After all is said and done, this is what you’ll end up with…

Step 9:  The second technique I used for another tree is the rolled tissue paper rosette. Grab several strips of tissue paper, and I do mean several, and fold them in half lengthwise and begin twisting them. Don’t worry about being perfect, the more imperfection the better. I recommend twisting all of your strips of paper first this will help you down the road when it comes time to glue the rosettess onto the tree’s form.
With all of your strips of tissue paper pre-twisted you can begin to make your rosettes. Start by simply rolling the tissue paper around itself several times. Pinch this down so that it flattens and resume rolling the paper around itself until you end up with something resembling a rosette.
With your rolled tissue paper in one hand, apply a bit of mod podge to your tree form somewhere in the center of your form and glue your rosette in place.
  Starting in the center of your form will make it so that you do not end up with a uniform line along the bottom. You may also play around with sizes of your rosettes by using shorter lengths of tissue paper. This will help fill in the holes left by some larger rosettes.
 Just like with the gold tree, you’ll want the bottom most rosettes to extend past the bottom of the form so that they can be turned in thus covering up your edge of the tree form. When you’re through (and this one will take you a good long while) you’ll have something like this…
Step 10: Last but not least is the 3rd variety of tabletop Christmas tree. This one will be your heaviest and I recommend that you make it the shortest of your trees. Start by laying your bamboo skewers against the form, pointy side up and measure out how much you’ll need to trim off the length. Snip the excess length off with your garden snips. You can use an alternative way of cutting these, but the garden snips turned out to be a huge life aka time saver. Gluing the skewers equal distance from each other, you will begin to crowd the top of the form. Begin cutting off more length of the skewers and gluing these shortened skewers in place between the longer ones. Let the pointed end of the skewer help to stabalize the skewer while the glue is drying. For this step I went to my handy dandy hot glue gun to speed up the process.
 The last step is to cover up the skewers using the 1″ strips of tissue paper you’ve already cut up. Apply a thin layer of Mod Podge to the skewers and lay a strip of tissue paper over it gently pressing the paper into the grooves between the skewers with your finger. Once the entire form is covered,  be sure to go over any spots or seams where the paper could come apart. Apply another thin layer of Mod Podge to act as a sealant.
When you get to the end, just as with the previous 2 trees, leave an extra bit of length of tissue paper and fold it under the tree form securing it in place with glue.
When it’s all said and done, you’ll end up with something a little bit like this…

I hope you enjoyed these as much as I did. It may have take a long time but the trade off is the pride in the price! And think If you had the tissue paper on hand already, this could be done for the cost of poster board which I know is only $0.38 at Walmart.

If you haven’t already, be sure to enter today’s giveaway and one lucky reader will receive these decorative trees!

Michelle

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