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12 Days of Christmas: Day 3 Paper Pine Tree Giveaway

UPDATE: This giveaway is closedCongrats to Cyndy Barbian who was randomly selected to receive the Anthropologie Inspired Paper Pine Tree.

When I saw this awesome paper tree over at Anthropoloie  I fell in love and then when I saw the price, I just fell over. NO WAY! So I set out to recreate their paper pine and I’m super happy with the turn out. One of the only things that makes this a yuletide decoration is the use of Christmas sheet music in the tree’s construction. “Well fa-la-la-la-la- la-la-dee-dah” I thought. I searched through an old hymnal I had picked up a few months back and pulled out all the sheet music in their Christmas section. It wasn’t enough for the whole piece but it’s in there and that’s what counts. I know you’ll want to make your own, so here’s what I did. But before we get too involved be sure to enter today’s giveaway to win this awesome and thrifty creation!


Step 1: Gather your supplies

  • Sheet music
  • A bamboo skewer
  • Foam Core
  • Scissors/Rotary Cutter & Mat
  • Ruler
  • Pinking Shears
  • Eyelet punch (anything that will punch a small hole)
  • Tissue Paper (optional)
  • Mod Podge (optional)
  • Glue gun and glue sticks (not pictured)
  • small glass ornament
Step 2: Start cutting our squares from your sheet music. You’ll need 4″, 3½”, 3″, 2½”, 2″,1½”, and 1″ squares. I didn’t actually count how many I cut of each size, but I would cut out more than you think you’ll need. Trust me you don’t want to have to repeat this step after you’ve started assembling all the components. That’s just frustrating and you’ll loose your momentum. for the 4″ squares I probably cut out about 15-20 squares.
I had to share what I found while flipping through the hymnal randomly. Apparently someone got bored at church and tore a hole through hymn number 147
Step 3: With your pinking shears, trim the edges of all the squares you’ve just cut out. I recommend cutting over a small bag or plate of anything to catch all the little bits of paper that’ll come flying off the edges of your squares.
Like Rachel Rae keeps a trash bowl in the kitchen, I keep a paper lunch bag with me when I’m crafting to throw any and all trash and scraps into. I know that more often than not, my crafting will be interrupted by wee little millionayres munchkins and scrambling to clean up my messes between diaper changes, filling sippy cups will milk, and building grandiose block towers just doesn’t always get done.  But I digress..
Step 4: Now that you have all your squares cut out, you can start punching a hole in the center. I used a 3/16″ spring loaded Eyelet Punch that I got probably 7 or 8 years ago that came in a set of 3 (the link is to the cheapest ones I could find on Amazon).
You could easily cut a criss-crossed slit in the center of your paper squares with an exacto knife but I loved how fast the project came together because of these perfectly sized holes.
Step 5: Now with all your squares cut and hole punched, move on to cutting 2″, 1″ and ½” squares out of your foam core. These will act as spacers between the sheets of paper.  Again, I didn’t exactly count out how many of each to make I just cut 2 rows of 2″ squares from my foam core. I did the same with the 1″ squares but only 1 row of ½” squares. I also cut out 3- 3″ squares that I used to form the base for my paper pine.
Step 6: Take your 3- 3″ sections of foam core and glue them together with hot glue. You could use a different type of glue, but for speed and convenience, I chose hot glue. Remember, hot glue dried fast so you want to adhere your pieces to each other quickly so that they’re flat against each other and do not have any space between them because the glue somewhat dried in some areas before the pieces could be joined.
Step 7: This part is optional. I decided rather last minute that I didn’t want to simply have a base made of exposed foam core, so I snagged some of the left over strips of tissue paper from Day 2’s Tabletop tree and decoupaged it to the base.
I used the strips of gold tissue paper that I had, but obviously you can do this with a whole sheet of tissue paper for a more uniform look. Be sure to add more Mod Podge to your strips of paper to seal them down.

This is what the end result was after the glue dried. Does anyone else feel like busting out in a round of “I’ve got the golden ticket” from Willie Wonka? No? Just me?
Step 8: Regardless of the finish of your base, next using the pointy end of your bamboo skewer, poke a hold in the center of your base. Flip your skewer around and insert it into the hole pushing through all the layers until you hit the bottom. Remove the skewer and carefully squeeze a dot of hot glue into the hole and re-insert your skewer, flat side down.
 
 Step 9: Take one
of you 2″ foam core pieces and using the pointy end of the skewer poke a hole in the foam core and slide the piece down. Run a bead of hot glue about an inch from the base and push the skewered foam core onto the glue. This will hold the first piece of foam core in place.
Step 10: Start placing your squares of paper 2 at a time followed by a piece of foam core layering until all your pieces are used or you feel that you’ve used a sufficient amount of paper in each predetermined size to create a graduating slope to the top of your paper pine.
After you’re done placing all the 4″ and 3 ½” squares, begin using the 1″ foam core spacers for the 3″, 2½” and 2″ sections of your paper pine.
Move onto using the ½” foam spacers one you start using up your 1½” and 1″ paper squares. I found that piercing the foam core with a sharp point like that of your exacto knife will allow you to push the bamboo skewer through without bending it.
Continue adding paper squares until you reach a point where your paper would rest just beneath the top of the skewer after you’ve placed your ornament on top.
 
Step 11: In order for your upside down ornament not to shift around, take scrap pieces of your sheet music and begin making tiny crumpled up pieces to shove into the void of the ornament.
Once the bulb of the ornament is full, place it back on top of the skewer and make sure that you can push through the paper and create a sort of hole for the end of the skewer to fit into.

Step 12: Take your hot glue gun and insert it’s nozzle into the opening of the ornament. Squeeze several times to fill the inside with glue and then place the ornament upside down fitting over the bamboo skewer.
Stand back and marvel at your accomplishment and the simple joy of making something super chic and super cheap.
Be sure to enter today’s giveaway for your chance to win this stunning piece!
Michelle
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